mini fresh 002: your weekly outdoor advocacy update

From breaking political news to outdoor advocacy movements, the world around us seems to be moving extra fast these days–and it’s hard to keep up sometimes. To help you stay in the loop, I’m going to start providing mini quick + gritty updates on all things advocacy and the outdoors. Let’s dig in:

ADVOCACY UPDATES + NEWS:

Yes, it’s a lame duck session right now–but there’s a big story happening for public lands and the outdoor industry in Congress. There’s a lot of movement on a package of bills that includes reauthorizing the Land and Water Conservation Fund (read more here if you don’t know what LWCF is), solutions to the National Parks Service backlog, the Recreation Not Red Tape Act, and more. REI’s President Jerry Stritzke wrote an op-ed in The Hill about the bipartisan opportunity we have to get goodness done for our public lands.

Follow my updates on OIA’s Twitter channel here, it could all come together or fall apart at any moment. At this point, it sounds like a public lands package is likely to pass, and if it does, it will definitely include permanent reauthorization of LWCF!

Speaking of LWCF, there was a LWCF press conference in DC this week held by key bipartisan congresspeople supporting reauthorization. Even Senator Cory Gardner gets it, this is such a win-win funding program for public lands.

After years of leadership under Rep. Rob Bishop (UT-R), the House Natural Resources Committee will now be chaired by Rep. Raul Grijalva (AZ-D). I have visited Rep. Grijalva’s office in DC a few times, and it’s always a lobbying highlight. He is a champion for core issues like public lands protection and native sovereignty. Here’s my favorite quote from this article about Rep. Grijalva’s plans to tackle climate change in his new position:

“We have an opportunity to take this committee and its priorities and its policies and legislative initiatives and steer it in a different direction. Under our jurisdiction, we have issues that have to be dealt with — tribal sovereignty, education, health care, historical and cultural resource preservation.

The other issue is climate change. It touches every issue that we deal with, and the fossil-fuel extraction industries are making such a rush for resources in our public lands. This administration, in two years, has made every effort to suppress science and dumb down the issue of climate change. We want to elevate that again to the status it deserves in decision-making.” (source)

ONE WAY TO TAKE ACTION:

‘Tis this season of gratitude giving, and Outdoor Alliance has a letter-writing tool to thank key lawmakers for the their work on the above mentioned public lands package that could have big impacts on US outdoor spaces–and remind them to light a fire under their tooshes to get the package across the finish line and make! it! happen! Write a letter to your reps here. 

What I’m Reading:
  • OIA recently hired a new Vice President of Government Affairs, Patricia Rojas-Ungár, and I am amped. She brings such good advocacy energy, she’s super talented, and she’s Latinx. Read this SNEWS interview with her.
  • This in-depth feature piece from Nat Geo on Bears Ears and public lands. Highlights included a thorough guide through the history of US land, from stealing the land from native people to Clive Bundy, and seeing a shoutout to the public lands march organized by OIA in SLC last summer.
What I’m Watching:
  • Michigan Line 5 – My friend Adam Wells created this beautiful and tragic film about a pipeline that runs through the Great Lakes region. I visited this area a few weeks ago during my solo midwest trip, and I couldn’t believe that this environmental crisis is looming in such a precious landscape. Here’s a poignant snippet, and you can watch the whole thing below:

    Every day 23 million gallons of oil are pumped under the largest freshwater system on the planet, putting over 450 miles of shoreline and 100,000 acres of water at risk. The Great Lakes supply drinking water to 40 million people, provide crucial habitat to 47 species, and support a handful of multi-billion dollar industries. Line 5 expired fifteen years ago. It’s not a matter of if it spills, but when.

Before the Spill from Adam Wells on Vimeo.

Got a bit of advocacy news or updates I ought to know about and include in the next mini fresh? Leave a comment or send me an e-mail! 

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One thought on “mini fresh 002: your weekly outdoor advocacy update

  1. Laura (Lolo) Kenderes says:

    So happy you have started this! Truly appreciate you taking the time to put this together! All the love, Lolo

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